HEALTH & SAFETY NEWS UPDATE – 27TH AUGUST 2015

IN THIS UPDATE

Introduction

Self-employed – do I have duties?

Business case studies

Safety Alert – ‘Norfolk Range’ large wheeled dry powder fire extinguishers manufactured before 2009 by UK Fire International Ltd

Links to guidance on CDM 2015

Introduction

With the late summer bank holiday in striking distance, there’s no getting away from the fact that Autumn is on the horizon. And our typical British wet weather is not the only thing to have dampened our spirits over the summer months. Tragic incidents such as the Bosley Wood Flour Mill explosion and Shoreham Airshow crash have brought health and safety very much into the public eye. With investigations ongoing, the causes remain to be seen, but could possibly result in a criminal inquiry at the flour mill if evidence of negligence is found. According to an HSE press release (http://press.hse.gov.uk/2015/further-hse-enforcement-notices-issued-at-bosley-wood-flour-mill/), a Prohibition Notice has been served on the mill owners, “preventing work activities until the issues identified involving the processing and bagging of large amounts of paper dust in one of the sheds on site, have been resolved”. In their guidance document “Safe handling of combustible dusts – Precautions against explosions”(http://www.hse.gov.uk/pUbns/priced/hsg103.pdf), the HSE advises that dusts produced by many materials we use everyday are flammable, and, in the form of a cloud, can explode.

Are you self-employed? From 1 October 2015, if your work activity poses no potential risk to the health and safety of other workers or members of the public, then health and safety law will not apply to you. If you don’t know whether or not your work activity falls into this category, more information is provided below.

Do you want to know how other businesses manage health and safety? The latest suite of HSE business case studies below provides links to a variety of video and narrative case studies of businesses doing just that, effectively and proportionately, with the help of online HSE guidance.

Do your work activities involve manufacturing, warehousing or engineering? Then you may be familiar with large dry powder fire extinguishers, which are the subject of HSE’s latest safety alert.

Finally, and following on from our previous news updates on CDM 2015, we close this week with links to the following guidance:

  • L153 – Managing health and safety in construction – CDM 2015: Guidance on Regulations
  • INDG411 – Need building work done? A short guide for clients on CDM 2015 (rev)
  • Construction Phase Plan for small projects (CDM 2015) – CIS80
  • Industry guidance for dutyholders
  • CITB CDM wizard app for construction phase plan

We hope you find our news updates useful. If you know of anyone who may benefit from reading them, please encourage them to register at the bottom-left of our news page (http://www.eljay.co.uk/news/) and we’ll email them a link each time an update is published. If in the unlikely event any difficulties are experienced whilst registering we’ll be more than happy to help and can be contacted on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk

Self-employed – do I have duties?

In 2011, the Löfstedt Review link to external website recommended that those self-employed whose work activities pose no potential risk of harm to others should be exempt from health and safety law. This recommendation was accepted by Government.

So, from 1 October 2015, if you are self-employed and your work activity poses no potential risk to the health and safety of other workers or members of the public, then health and safety law will not apply to you.

HSE estimates that health and safety law will no longer apply to 1.7 million self-employed people like novelists, journalists, graphic designers, accountants, confectioners, financial advisors and online traders.

What the law says

The Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 (General Duties of Self-Employed Persons) (Prescribed Undertakings) Regulations 2015 (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukdsi/2015/9780111136980), says:

  • if your work activity is specifically mentioned in the regulations above
  • or if your work activity poses a risk to the health and safety of others, then the law applies to you

What is meant by ‘self-employed’?

For health and safety law purposes, ‘self-employed’ means that you do not work under a contract of employment (http://www.hse.gov.uk/enforce/enforcementguide/investigation/status-contract.htm) and work only for yourself.

If you’re self-employed and employ others the law will apply to you. You may be self-employed for tax purposes, but this may not be so for health and safety. This is a complex area and HMRC have produced employment status guidance (https://www.gov.uk/working-for-yourself/what-counts-as-self-employed).

What is a ‘risk to the health and safety of others’?

This is the likelihood of someone else being harmed or injured (eg members of the public, clients, contractors etc) as a consequence of your work activity.

Most self-employed people will know if their work poses a risk to the health and safety of others. You must consider the work you are doing and judge for yourself if it creates a risk or not.

For example if you operate a fairground ride for the public to use then your work could affect the health and safety of other people and you must take appropriate steps to protect them as the law will apply to you.

Find out more about ‘risk’

HSE guidance on risk management (http://www.hse.gov.uk/risk/index.htm) explains more about the risks your work activity may create and how best to manage these.

High risk activities

The law says that there are certain work activities where the law applies because they are high risk. If your work involves any of these activities, then the law will apply to you:

  • Agriculture
  • Construction
  • Gas
  • Railways
  • Asbestos
  • GMOs

For more information visit the self-employed workers guidance topic page on the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/self-employed/index.htm or contact us on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk and we’ll be more than happy to help.

Business case studies

This is the latest suite of HSE business case studies, where businesses tell their stories of how they manage health and safety effectively and proportionately and how online HSE guidance helps them to do this.

Two of the case studies focus primarily on leadership, while the others describe examples of health and safety management in SMEs.

The video case studies were produced in collaboration with 3rd year Film Production and Media students from Edge Hill University in West Lancashire.

Video case studies

Bootle Containers Ltd

Bootle Containers is a medium sized manufacturing company with 55 employees, specialising in design and production of containers.  This film describes the company’s health and safety management systems and why they think good health and safety is good for business.

Link to video: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/bootle-containers.htm

Lamont Cleaning and Support Services

Lamont is a small company of 15 employees, specialising in commercial and industrial window cleaning. This film shows how they work with their employees to manage health and safety.

Link to video: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/lamont-cleaning.htm

Laser Quest Stourbridge

Laser Quest Stourbridge is a hi tech gaming centre with 11 employees. This film describes how the owner manages the company’s health and safety.

Link to video: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/laser-quest.htm

Merseytravel

Merseytravel is the strategic transport authority for the Liverpool City Region, with 850 employees. This film tells how effective leadership and employee engagement improved health and safety performance.

Link to video: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/merseytravel.htm

Mount Anvil Ltd

Mount Anvil is a medium sized construction and development company based in London. In this film, senior leaders from the company describe how they manage health and safety and why it is so important to their business.

Link to video: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/mount-anvil.htm

Narrative case studies

Applied Industrial Systems Ltd.

Applied Industrial Systems Ltd (AIS) specialises in the creation and provision of software and control systems to a diverse client base across the transport, infrastructure and manufacturing sectors.

Link to case study: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/ais.htm

Connors Building & Restoration Services Ltd.

Connors Building & Restoration Services is an asset management company with 33 employees, specialising in building services, ground maintenance and inspection.

Link to case study: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/connors-building.htm

Loop Technology Ltd.

Loop Technology is a small, family run business with 21 employees, specialising in industrial automation.

Link to case study: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/loop.htm

Technicraft (Anglia) Ltd

Technicraft is a metal fabrication company with 25 employees. It provides services including laser cutting, punching, presswork and welding.

Link to case study: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/technicraft.htm

More narrative case studies for SMEs and larger businesses can be found by visiting the Business case studies page on the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/case-studies.htm?ebul=hsegen&cr=2/27-jul-15 or contact us for advice and guidance on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk, and we’ll be more than happy to help.

Safety Alert – ‘Norfolk Range’ large wheeled dry powder fire extinguishers manufactured before 2009 by UK Fire International Ltd

Issue Date

12 August 2015

Target Audience

All premises where large dry powder fire extinguishers are likely to be used for example: chemical industry, offshore industry, merchant shipping, nuclear industry, manufacturing, mining, warehousing, engineering, metals and minerals processing and production.

Key Issues

‘Norfolk Range’ large dry powder fire extinguishers, manufactured before 2009, may be affected by moisture ingress at a threaded joint at the base of the unit, rendering the unit inoperable. The problem may not be identified during routine service inspections.

  • Users should identify if their extinguishers are likely to be affected. If yes and the extinguisher has been left exposed to adverse conditions since its last extended service, the condition of the elbow joint at the base of the unit should be examined by a competent service engineer.
  • If you are unsure if your extinguishers are affected by this safety alert, consult Britannia Fire Ltd.
  • Service engineers should closely examine, and if necessary, remove the elbow to confirm if there is evidence of water ingress to the discharge tube. If there is any doubt about moisture affecting the powder in the discharge tube, consider subjecting the extinguisher to an extended service including full replacement of the dry powder.

For more information click on the link: http://www.hse.gov.uk/safetybulletins/norfolk-large-wheeled-dry-powder-fire-extinguishers.htm or contact us on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk, and we’ll be more than happy to help.

Links to guidance on CDM 2015

L153 – Managing health and safety in construction – CDM 2015: Guidance on Regulations

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/l153.htm?ebul=gd-cons/jul15&cr=2

INDG411 – Need building work done? A short guide for clients on CDM 2015 (rev)

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg411.htm?ebul=gd-cons/jul15&cr=3

Construction Phase Plan for small projects (CDM 2015) – CIS80

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cis80.pdf?ebul=gd-cons/jul15&cr=4

Industry guidance for dutyholders

http://www.citb.co.uk/health-safety-and-other-topics/health-safety/construction-design-and-management-regulations/cdm-guidance-documents/

CITB CDM wizard app for construction phase plan

http://www.citb.co.uk/health-safety-and-other-topics/health-safety/construction-design-and-management-regulations/cdm-wizard-app/

Please note that the HSE are starting to remove the current CDM 2007 web pages and plan to remove them all by October 2015.

Contains public sector information published by the Health and Safety Executive and licensed under the Open Government Licence

Also contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.

 

HEALTH & SAFETY NEWS UPDATE – 6TH AUGUST 2015

IN THIS UPDATE

Introduction

CDM 2015 Principal Designer Role – FAQs

Powered Gates

Cutting Red Tape – The Government wants you to tell them which regulatory issues hamper your business

HSE and HMRC working together for you – growing your business

Introduction

It’s been four months now since The Construction (Design & Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015) came into force, replacing CDM 2007. As virtually everyone involved in a construction project has legal duties under the regulations, it’s not surprising that the HSE has received many enquiries since the change, including those about the role of the principal designer (PD), and we open this week’s update with the HSE’s answers to some of these questions.

Following the deaths five years ago of two children after becoming trapped in powered gates, the HSE issued the following safety notices (click on the links):

http://www.hse.gov.uk/safetybulletins/electricgates.htm

http://www.hse.gov.uk/safetybulletins/electricgates2.htm

Whilst, thankfully, there have been no similar reports since then (as far as we are aware), a research report recently published by the HSE has highlighted several safety related inadequacies in the design of powered gates and so this week we’re looking at the responsibilities of those whose role it is to ensure that powered (automatic) doors and gates on their premises are safe.

Is your business hampered by regulations? Whilst we join the HSE in encouraging a “common sense” approach to health and safety, we’re certainly aware of constraints faced by our clients when trying to comply with regulations. RIDDOR (Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013) is a common example. Of course we’re happy to help, where we can, in helping clients overcome these issues but we welcome the move by the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) in launching a new twitter account to encourage business, and in particular, small business, to highlight issues they have.

Additional issues/concerns are faced by small businesses as they start to grow or take on more employees, and HMRC and the Health and Safety Executive are working together to deliver a live webinar about the typical situations likely to be faced. You can find out more about/register for this at the close of this update.

Our next update will be published at the end of this month, after which we’ll keep you updated on a weekly basis. But if you have any queries in the meantime, please don’t hesitate to contact us on 07896 016380, at Fiona@eljay.co.uk or via our website. Alternatively, check out the HSE website (http://www.hse.gov.uk/) where you’ll be able to find the answers to many frequently asked questions.

CDM 2015 Principal Designer Role – FAQs

The Health & Safety Executive (HSE) has received many enquires on The Construction (Design & Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015) and they will be updating their web pages (http://www.hse.gov.uk/construction/cdm/2015/index.htm) with further information in due course.

In the meantime, here are a couple of answers to some frequently asked questions about the role of the principal designer (PD).

Who can carry out the role of the principal designer (PD)? 

The PD must be a designer – an architect, consulting engineer or quantity surveyor, or anyone who specifies and alters designs as part of their work.  They can also be clients, contractors and trades people if they carry out design work or arrange for or instruct persons under their control to do so.

They must have the right mix of skills, knowledge and experience (SKE) or organisational capability to carry out all the functions and responsibilities assigned to them in Regulations 11 and 12 and have control over the pre-construction phase.

Commonly, the PD is likely to be:

For larger projects – a design practice or a technical department of a principal contractor e.g. a principal contractor doing design and build;

For smaller projects – a self-employed architect/technician, small design practice, a project management company, a client’s internal estates management team, or even a specialist tradesperson such as an electrician where they lead on the design function;

So long as they meet the criteria of;

– being a designer;

– having the relevant SKE or organisational capability, and;

– being in control of the pre-construction phase.

Does CDM 2015 require the principal designer to be a member of the project design team? 

No.  The PD must be appointed by the client as soon as it is established that more than one contractor is or is likely to be working on the project to plan, manage, monitor and control the design stages.

If the client gets it right and appoints the PD early at the concept stage, then the appointment should commonly take place before the project design team has been fully identified or assembled.

The PD may provide their own design team, appoint a team or manage and control any team appointed by others.

Whatever the model, which provides maximum flexibility for the client, – the PD must be able to prove to the client that they have the SKE or organisational capability to fulfil all the functions – proportionate to the nature, size, complexity and risk profile of the project.  Once in place, the PD should be in control of the design team so that they, and the design team, can carry out their roles effectively.

Can a client carry out the role of the principal designer? 

Yes. If a client fails to, or decides not to appoint a PD the law provides that the PD role is automatically assigned to the client.

Many clients will choose to take on the PD role themselves but irrespective of whether by choice or otherwise, the client must have the SKE or organisational capability to fulfil all the PD functions and responsibilities effectively.

Powered Gates

In the light of recently published HSE research report RR1056 – ‘Critical analysis of safety related design of powered gates’ – which highlights several safety-related inadequacies and suggests alternative safety measures, those whose role it is to ensure that powered (automatic) doors and gates on their premises are safe, may be seeking clarification of their responsibilities.

The HSE web page ‘Powered gates’ (http://www.hse.gov.uk/work-equipment-machinery/powered-gates/introduction.htm) provides information and guidance (including the following – click on the links for more info) for safety on the design, construction, supply, and use, inspection, examination and maintenance of powered gates:

Basics on risks, safety and the law (http://www.hse.gov.uk/work-equipment-machinery/powered-gates/basics.htm)

Risks from powered gates

Powered gates can give rise to a number of significant hazards, including those from being:

– hit by the moving gate

– crushed against fixed and / or other moving parts

– trapped between fixed, moving and other parts

– caught on moving parts, eg gears

– electrocuted, as most are powered by electric motors, or controlled electrically

– affected by hydraulic or pneumatic parts, where these are present

Responsibilities of designers, manufacturers, installers, owners, repairers, etc (http://www.hse.gov.uk/work-equipment-machinery/powered-gates/responsibilities.htm)

Owners, occupiers and users

While the responsibility for safe design / construction and installation may rest with others, the owner / user should ensure that the installed product is safe, and kept safe. In particular they should study the User Instructions that must come with the product, assessing what servicing and inspection / safety checks may be necessary.

More on Safety by design/construction, when in use, or following maintenance (http://www.hse.gov.uk/work-equipment-machinery/powered-gates/safety.htm)

Maintaining for safety

Component parts can wear and fail, sometimes catastrophically. Like most machinery, powered doors and gates need to be maintained to remain safe. Powered gates forming parts of workplaces or in common parts of residential complexes will be subject to health and safety law. Owners, occupiers, landlords and managing agents will have on-going responsibilities for the safety of all users and all those who may encounter the gate.

Powered Gate FAQs (http://www.hse.gov.uk/work-equipment-machinery/faq-powered-gates.htm)

What are the risks with powered (automatic) doors and gates, and how can they be controlled?

What if I think a gate is unsafe?

I’m a domestic householder, do I have to do anything?

I own a commercial/industrial premises, what do I have to do?

I install doors and gates, what must I do?

As a maintenance contractor, what do I have to do?

What are the main safety requirements for these machines?

What does the law say?

Where can I get more information?

Our comment

We check the operation of powered gates when carrying out health & safety inspections of commercial and residential property. Optical/stop sensors should operate satisfactorily, and confirmation should be provided that the gates have been risk assessed and are maintained by a suitably qualified contractor in order to meet current legislative requirements.

Cutting Red Tape – The Government wants you to tell them which regulatory issues hamper your business

The Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) have launched a new twitter account to encourage business, and in particular, small business, to highlight issues they have with regulation. BIS are keen to promote this account to help engage and better understand the regulatory concerns of business, and to hear it direct from them.

You can get involved by:

– Following @CutRedTapeUK for discussion on Twitter

– Remembering to use the hashtag #cutredtape in your tweets

– Share information on how small business can grow through your social media channels, tweet using #cutredtape

– Do you have a newsletter, online group or forum? Encourage discussion about regulatory issues and share feedback.

Our comment

We’re on Twitter too! We’re following @CutRedTapeUK, and you can follow us at @Eljay_Risk_Mgmt to stay up to date with health & safety news and our range of support and training services.

HSE and HMRC working together for you – growing your business

If your business is growing and you have questions on health and safety and taking on new employees, you can find answers in a live webinar delivered by HSE and HMRC.

Webinar overview

As your business starts to grow or you take on more employees you’ll face new issues and concerns. HMRC and the Health and Safety Executive are working together to deliver a live webinar about the typical situations you are likely to face. It looks at some of the questions you may have and guides you through the answers.

Webinar dates (click on the links to register)

12 August 2015, 10am – https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4319267968957115650

16 September 2015, 10am – https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6473058415654087938

13 October 2015, 10am – https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/30011536368234241

Once you have registered the webinar organizer will communicate with you regarding these events.

Our comment

Of course we’re always available to answer any questions you may have about health and safety. Contact us on 07896 016380, at Fiona@eljay.co.uk or via our website.

Contains public sector information published by the Health and Safety Executive and licensed under the Open Government Licence

Also contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.