Demolition health and safety – company and contractor sentenced for uncontrolled collapse of building on high street

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The owner of a building in Kent and the contractor employed to demolish it have been fined for safety failings after an uncontrolled collapse onto a high street.

An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) into the collapse, which occurred in November 2013, found that the contractor had failed to properly plan the work and then carried out unsafe demolition work.

The building owner did not make any enquiries into the suitability or competence of the contractor to undertake the demolition.

Neither the building owner nor the contractor applied for a road closure and members of the public were put at risk.

The building owner pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 4(1) of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007, and was fined £160,000 and ordered to pay costs of £9128.89.

The contractor pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 25(1) of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007, and has been sentenced to nine months imprisonment suspended for two years.

HSE inspector Andrew Cousins said after the hearing: “Lives were put at risk when this structure uncontrollably collapsed. Clients have a responsibility to appoint competent contractors to undertake hazardous work such as demolition.

“Those in control of demolition have a responsibility to plan demolition work and to devise a safe way of working that protects both the workers and members of the public.

“The job could have been safely carried out by simply undertaking the demolition behind a substantial hoarding.”

Demolition

What you need to do

The law says that all demolition, dismantling and structural alteration must be carefully planned and carried out in a way that prevents danger by practitioners with the relevant skills, knowledge and experience. Key issues are:

  • Falls from height
  • Injury from falling materials
  • Uncontrolled collapse
  • Risks from connected services
  • Traffic management
  • Hazardous materials
  • Noise and vibration
  • Fire
  • Worker involvement

What you need to know

A systematic approach to demolition projects is a team effort between many people, who all have responsibilities:

  • Clients must appoint dutyholders who have the relevant skills, knowledge and experience and where organisations, the organisational capability, and are adequately resourced.
  • Clients, with the help of the principal designer must provide those who need it (eg, designers, contractors) with pre-construction information that can reasonably be obtained. A range of surveys and reports will be needed – for example, to check for presence of asbestos; structural stability of site and nearby structures; the location of above and below ground live services in the work area; etc. These should be done before work begins and not be left for the principal contractor to organise once the demolition work has started.
  • Principal designers must plan, manage, monitor and coordinate health and safety issues in the pre-construction phase (i.e. before demolition starts) to give principal contractors as much information as possible to allow the principal contractor to keep people (site workers and the public) as far as possible from the risks.
  • Principal contractors must plan, manage, monitor and coordinate health and safety issues during the demolition work.
  • Site managers must ensure workers are supervised and are following safe working practice.
  • Sub-contractors and site workers must follow the instructions and plans given to them by those in charge of the work and ensure that their colleagues do too.

Falls from height

During demolition and dismantling, workers can be injured falling from edges, through openings, fragile surfaces and partially demolished floors.

Dutyholders have a responsibility to assess, eliminate and control the risks of falls from height. Find out more about falls from height: http://www.hse.gov.uk/construction/safetytopics/workingatheight.htm.

Injury from falling materials

Workers and passers-by can be injured by the premature and uncontrolled collapse of structures, and by flying debris.

A safe system of work is one that keeps people as far as possible from the risks. This may include:

  • establishing exclusion zones and hard-hat areas, clearly marked and with barriers or hoardings if necessary
  • covered walkways
  • using high-reach machines
  • reinforcing machine cabs so that drivers are not injured
  • training and supervising site workers

Uncontrolled collapse

The structural survey should consider:

  • the age of the structure
  • its previous use
  • the type of construction
  • nearby buildings or structures
  • the weight of removed material or machinery on floors above ground level

The method statement for the demolition should identify the sequence required to prevent accidental collapse of the structure.

Risks from connected services

Gas, electricity, water and telecommunications services need to be isolated or disconnected before demolition work begins. If this is not possible, pipes and cables must be labelled clearly, to make sure they are not disturbed.

Traffic management

Effective traffic management systems are essential on site, to avoid putting workers at risk of being hit by vehicles turning, slewing, or reversing. Where possible, vision aids and zero tail swing machines should be used. Find out more about traffic management

Hazardous materials

Hazardous materials that should to be considered include dust, asbestos and respirable crystalline silica (RCS).There may also be material or contamination on site that has not been cleared, for example:

  • acids from industrial processes
  • paints
  • flammable liquids
  • unidentified drums
  • microbiological hazards (especially in old hospital buildings).

Find out more about the control of substances hazardous to health (COSHH): http://www.hse.gov.uk/coshh/index.htm

Noise and vibration

Frequent exposure to loud noise can permanently damage a persons hearing. Noise can also create a safety risk if it makes it difficult for workers to communicate effectively or stops them hearing warning signals.

Vibrating hand tools used in demolition can cause hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS).Workers exposure to vibration must be managed and reduced as far as possible.

Fire

Fire is a risk where hot work (using any tools that generate spark, flame or heat) is being done. During structural alteration, the fire plan must be kept up to date as the escape routes and fire points may alter. There must be an effective way to raise the alarm.

Worker involvement

Everyone involved must to know what precautions are to be taken on site. Workplaces where employees are involved in taking decisions about health and safety are safer and healthier. Your employees are often the best people to understand the risks in their workplace. Find out more about involving your workers in health and safety: http://www.hse.gov.uk/involvement

Resources

Leaflets

Books

Useful links – other HSE sites

The law

For more information, visit the HSE web page: http://www.hse.gov.uk/construction/safetytopics/demolition.htm or contact us on 07896 016380 or at fiona@eljay.co.uk, and we’ll be happy to help

Contains public sector information published by the Health and Safety Executive and licensed under the Open Government Licence

 

 

Need building work done? A short guide for clients (building owners, users or managing agents) on the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015

We hope you find our news updates useful. If you know of anyone who may benefit from reading them, please encourage them to register at the bottom-left of our news page (http://www.eljay.co.uk/news/) and we’ll email them a link each time an update is published. If in the unlikely event any difficulties are experienced whilst registering we’ll be more than happy to help and can be contacted on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk

This guidance is aimed at you if you are a building owner, user or managing agent and are having maintenance, small-scale building work or other minor works carried out in connection with a business – as you will be a client with legal duties under the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015).

Following the simple steps below will help you meet your responsibilities as a client and ensure construction work and repairs are undertaken safely and without damaging worker’s and other people’s health.

What does CDM 2015 do?

Complying with CDM 2015 will help ensure that no-one is harmed during the work, and that your building is safe to use and maintain while giving you good value. Effective planning will also help ensure that your work is well managed with fewer unexpected costs and problems.

What do clients need to do?

Many clients, particularly those who only occasionally have construction work done, are not experts in construction work. Although you are not expected to actively manage or supervise the work yourself, you have a big influence over the way the work is carried out. Whatever the size of your project, you decide which designer and contractor will carry out the work and how much money, time and resource is available. The decisions you make have an impact on the health, safety and welfare of workers and others affected by the work.

CDM 2015 is not about creating unnecessary and unhelpful processes and paperwork. It is about choosing the right team and helping them to work together to ensure health and safety.

As a client, you need to do the following.

  1. Appoint the right people at the right time

If more than one contractor will be involved, you will need to appoint (in writing) a principal designer and a principal contractor.

A principal designer is required to plan, manage and coordinate the planning and design work.  Appoint them as early as possible so they can help you gather information about the project and ensure that the designers have done all they can to check that it can be built safely.

A principal contractor is required to plan, manage and coordinate the construction work. Appoint them as early as possible so they are involved in discussions with the principal designer about the work.

Getting the right people for the right job means your designers and your contractors need to have the skills, knowledge and experience to identify, reduce and manage health and safety risks. This is also the case if they are a company (known as having ‘organisational capability’ for the job). The designers and the contractors should be able to give references from previous clients for similar work and explain to you how they will achieve this.

Professional bodies can help you choose your architect and other designers. The Safety Schemes in Procurement (SSIP) website has lists of businesses which have been assessed on their health and safety management. A contractor may be a member of a trade association.

  1. Ensure there are arrangements in place for managing and organising the project

The work is more likely to be done without harming anyone and on time if it is properly planned and managed. Sometimes the work is complex and uses many different trades. Often it involves high-risk work such as the work listed in the bulleted list below. The principal designer should understand these types of risks and try to avoid them when designing your project. The principal contractor or builder should manage the risks on site.

These are the biggest causes of accidents and ill health in construction work, and your designer and contractor can manage the risks by doing the following.

Falls from height:

  • Make sure ladders are in good condition, at a 1:4 angle and tied or footed.
  • Prevent people and materials falling from roofs, gable ends, working platforms and open edges using guardrails, midrails and toeboards.
  • Make sure fragile roof surfaces are covered, or secure working platforms with guard rails are used on or below the roof.

Collapse of excavations:

  • Shore excavations; cover or barrier excavations to prevent people or vehicles from falling in.

Collapse of structures:

  • Support structures (such as walls, beams, chimney breasts and roofs) with props; ensure props are installed by a competent person.

Exposure to building dusts:

  • Prevent dust by using wet cutting and vacuum extraction on tools; use a vacuum cleaner rather than sweeping; use a suitable, well-fitting mask.

Exposure to asbestos:

  • Do not start work if it is suspected that asbestos may be present until a demolition/refurbishment survey has been carried out.

Electricity:

  • Turn the electricity supply and other services off before drilling into walls.
  • Do not use excavators or power tools near suspected buried services.

Protect members of the public, the client, and others:

  • Secure the site; net scaffolds and use rubbish chutes.

Discuss with your designer and builder before work starts and throughout the build how these risks are being managed.

  1. Allow adequate time

Work that is rushed is likely to be unsafe and of poor quality. Allow enough time for the design, planning and construction work to be undertaken properly.

  1. Provide information to your designer and contractor

Your designer and builder will need information about what you want built, the site and existing structures or hazards that may be present such as asbestos, overhead cables, and buried services. Providing this information at an early stage will help them to plan, budget and work around problems. Your principal designer can help you gather this information.

Putting together a ‘client brief’ at the earliest stages which includes as much information as you have about the project, along with the timescales and budget for the build and how you expect the project to be managed can help you to set the standards for managing health and safety.

  1. Communicate with your designer and building contractor

Your project will only run efficiently if everyone involved in the work communicates, cooperates and coordinates with each other.

During the design and planning stage, you, your designer and contractor need to discuss issues affecting what will be built, how it will be built, how it will be used and how it will be maintained when finished. This will avoid people being harmed or having unexpected costs because issues were not considered when design changes could still easily be made.

Meeting with your designer and contractor as the work progresses gives an opportunity to deal with problems that may arise and discuss health and safety. This will help to ensure that the work progresses as planned.

  1. Ensure adequate welfare facilities on site

Make sure that your contractor has made arrangements for adequate welfare facilities for their workers before the work starts. See the HSE publication Provision of welfare facilities during construction work (see ‘Further reading’).

  1. Ensure a construction phase plan is in place

The principal contractor (or contractor if there is only one contractor) has to draw up a plan explaining how health and safety risks will be managed. This should be proportionate to the scale of the work and associated risks and you should not allow work to start on site until there is a plan.

  1. Keep the health and safety file

At the end of the build the principal designer should give you a health and safety file. If the principal designer leaves before the end of the project, the principal contractor (or contractor if there is only one contractor) should do this. It is a record of useful information which will help you manage health and safety risks during any future maintenance, repair, construction work or demolition. You should keep the file, make it available to anyone who needs to alter or maintain the building, and update it if circumstances change.

  1. Protecting members of the public, including your employees

If you are an employer, or you have members of the public visiting your premises, you need to be sure that they are protected from the risks of construction work.

Discuss with your designer and contractor how the construction work may affect how you run your business, eg you may have to re-route pedestrian access; make sure signs to your entrance are clear; or change the way your deliveries operate.

  1. Ensure workplaces are designed correctly

If your project is for a new workplace or alterations to an existing workplace (eg a factory or office), it must meet the standards set out in the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 (see ‘Further reading’).

Notifying construction projects

For some construction work (work lasting longer than 30 days with more than 20 workers working at the same time, or involving 500 person days of work), you need to notify HSE of the project as soon as possible before construction work starts. In practice, you may request someone else to do this on your behalf.

How can you find out more?

Your principal designer or principal contractor will be able to advise you on your duties.

Why you should comply with your duties as a client

If you do not comply with CDM 2015, you are likely to be failing to influence the management of health and safety on your project. This means that your project could be putting workers and others at risk of harm, and that the finished structure may not achieve good standards and be value for money.

If you don’t appoint a principal designer or principal contractor you will be responsible for the things that they should have done.

Serious breaches of health and safety legislation on your construction project could result in construction work being stopped by HSE or your local authority and additional work may be needed to put things right. In the most serious circumstances, you could be prosecuted.

Fee for Intervention

HSE now recovers the costs of time spent dealing with material breaches of health and safety law. This is known as Fee for Intervention (FFI). FFI applies when an inspector finds something wrong that they believe is serious enough for them to write to you about. A fee is charged for the time spent by the inspector in sorting it out. Following the simple guidance in this leaflet may help you to avoid having to pay a fee.

Further reading

CONIAC industry guides http://www.citb.co.uk/health-safety-and-other-topics/health-safety/construction-design-and-management-regulations/cdm-guidance-documents/

Construction phase plan (CDM 2015): What you need to know as a busy builder Construction Information Sheet CIS80 HSE Books 2015 www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cis80.htm

Health and safety in construction HSG150 (Third edition) HSE Books 2006 ISBN 978 0 7176 6182 4 www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsg150.htm

Managing health and safety in construction. Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015. Guidance on regulations L153 HSE Books 2015 ISBN 978 0 7176 6626 3 www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/l153.htm

Provision of welfare facilities during construction work Construction Information Sheet CIS59 HSE Books 2010 www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cis59.htm

Workplace health, safety and welfare. Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992. Approved Code of Practice and guidance L24 (Second edition) HSE Books 2013 ISBN 978 0 7176 6583 9 www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/l24.htm

Contains public sector information published by the Health and Safety Executive and licensed under the Open Government Licence

 

 

HEALTH & SAFETY NEWS UPDATE – 29TH SEPTEMBER 2016

We hope you find our news updates useful. If you know of anyone who may benefit from reading them, please encourage them to register at the bottom-left of our news page (http://www.eljay.co.uk/news/) and we’ll email them a link each time an update is published. If in the unlikely event any difficulties are experienced whilst registering we’ll be more than happy to help and can be contacted on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk

Safer Sites target inspections – coming to a street near you

HSE construction inspectors will be carrying out unannounced visits to sites where refurbishment projects or repair works are underway.

This year the Initiative is being undertaken as a series of two week inspections across the country, beginning 3 October 2016 ending 4 November 2016.

During this period inspectors will ensure high-risk activities, particularly those affecting the health of workers, are being properly managed.

These include:

  • risks to health from exposure to dust such as silica are being controlled
  • workers are aware of where they may find asbestos, and what to do if they find it
  • other health risks, such as exposure to noise and vibration, manual handling and hazardous substances are being properly managed
  • jobs that involve working at height have been identified and properly planned to ensure that appropriate precautions, such as proper support of structures, are in place
  • equipment is correctly installed / assembled, inspected and maintained and used properly
  • sites are well organised, to avoid trips and falls, walkways and stairs are free from obstructions and welfare facilities are adequate

Where serious breaches of legislation are found then immediate enforcement action will be taken, but inspectors will also be taking steps to secure a positive change in behaviour to ensure on-going compliance.

Health and safety breaches with clients and designers will also be followed up to reinforce their duties under CDM 2015 and to ensure that all dutyholders with on site health and safety responsibilities understand and fulfil these.

Follow the SaferSites Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/SaferSites)  to see what inspectors find on site and keep updated throughout the initiative.

How to manage your site safely (click on the links for more info):    

For more information, visit the HSE web page: http://www.hse.gov.uk/construction/safetytopics/index.htm or contact us on 07896 016380 or fiona@eljay.co.uk, and we’ll be happy to help.

Contains public sector information published by the Health and Safety Executive and licensed under the Open Government Licence

 

 

HEALTH & SAFETY NEWS UPDATE – 4TH FEBRUARY 2016

REGISTER BELOW-LEFT TO RECEIVE OUR UPDATES BY EMAIL

IN THIS UPDATE

Introduction

HSE Myth Busters Challenge Panel Case 383 – Odd job person in managed block of flats not allowed to change light bulbs for health and safety reasons

HSE Health & Safety Bulletin – Use of Barrier Glands in Potentially Explosive Atmospheres to meet IEC 60079:14 2013 (Edition 5)

HSL/HSE CDM 2015 Training: the role of the Principal Designer

Introduction

‘Health and Safety’ is often incorrectly used as a convenient excuse to stop what are essentially sensible activities going ahead. The Health and Safety Executive has set up an independent panel – the Myth Busters Challenge Panel – to scrutinize such decisions. We open this week’s update with the panel’s response to a property management company citing health and safety as the reason for not allowing an odd job person to change light bulbs in a block of flats.

Electricity at work is also the theme of the HSE’s latest health & safety bulletin aimed at (amongst others) those designing, installing, inspecting and maintaining electrical equipment in potentially explosive atmospheres. Electrical (and non electrical) equipment and installations in potentially explosive atmospheres must be specially designed and constructed so that the risks of ignition are eliminated or reduced. The approach that the current IEC 60079-14: 2013 Standard allows duty holders to take, creates a fire and explosion risk, and this Notice provides information on what action to take.

Finally, we close this week’s update with details of a training event being delivered by HSL (the Health & Safety Executive’s Laboratory), aimed at designers, clients, contractors and/or individuals who may take on, or want to understand the Principal Designer function which replaced the role of CDM Co-ordinator under CDM 2015.

We hope you find our news updates useful. If you know of anyone who may benefit from reading them, please encourage them to register at the bottom-left of our news page (http://www.eljay.co.uk/news/) and we’ll email them a link each time an update is published. If in the unlikely event any difficulties are experienced whilst registering we’ll be more than happy to help and can be contacted on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk

HSE Myth Busters Challenge Panel Case 383 – Odd job person in managed block of flats not allowed to change light bulbs for health and safety reasons

‘Health and Safety’ is often incorrectly used as a convenient excuse to stop what are essentially sensible activities going ahead. The Health and Safety Executive has set up an independent panel – the Myth Busters Challenge Panel – to scrutinize such decisions.

The Panel is chaired by the HSE Chair Judith Hackitt, with HSE Board member Sarah Veale as the Vice-Chair and they are supported by a pool of independent members who represent a wide range of interests. This includes small businesses, public safety, trade union, the insurance industry and many outside interests where day-to-day common sense decisions on risk management are made.

This Panel will look into enquiries regarding the advice given by non-regulators such as insurance companies, health and safety consultants and employers and, quickly assess if a sensible and proportionate decision has been made. We want to make clear that “health and safety” is about managing real risks properly, not being risk averse and stopping people getting on with their lives.

If you think a decision or advice that you have been given in the name of health and safety is wrong, or disproportionate to what you are doing, you can contact the panel on the following web page: http://www.hse.gov.uk/contact/contact-myth-busting.htm. Guidance on how to raise a concern (http://www.hse.gov.uk/contact/concerns.htm) or complaint (http://www.hse.gov.uk/contact/complaints.htm) on workplace health and safety is also available.

Issue (Case 383)

A property management company advised that an odd job person is unable to change light bulbs as they would only be protected from negligence if a competent electrician carried out the job.

Panel opinion

Health and safety at work legislation does not require the use of a competent electrician to change light bulbs in a residential property. Confusing a perceived (but in all probability low) risk of being sued for negligence with the requirements of health and safety legislation is unhelpful, and can distort the aim of the legislation, which is to ensure a proportionate approach to managing risks.

An example risk assessment for the maintenance of flats is available on the following HSE web page: http://www.hse.gov.uk/risk/casestudies/flats.htm and health and safety guidance is also available on the ARMA website (Association of Residential Managing Agents): http://arma.org.uk/leasehold-library/document/health-safety/pages/1 or contact us on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk and we’ll be happy to help. We carry out health and safety inspections and fire/legionella risk assessments of commercial and residential properties.

HSE Health & Safety Bulletin – Use of Barrier Glands in Potentially Explosive Atmospheres to meet IEC 60079:14 2013 (Edition 5)

Target Audience

  • Chemical processing and production
  • Engineering
  • Warehousing
  • Offshore
  • Others: Duty holders designing, installing, inspecting and maintaining electrical equipment in potentially explosive atmospheres
  • COMAH Duty Holders and operators installing and maintaining electrical equipment in explosive atmospheres

Key Issues

There is currently a key difference between the current IEC 60079-14: 2013 Standard and previous versions of BS EN 60079-14: 2008 & IEC 60079-14: 2007 for use of electrical equipment in potentially explosive atmospheres in that the IEC Standard currently allows the Duty Holder to use a ‘standard’ Ex certified flameproof gland as opposed to a Ex certified ‘barrier gland’ without the requirement to apply the previous flowchart used in the British Standard which identified glanding requirements based on gas group / zone / enclosure size. There is evidence that this approach creates a fire and explosion risk and this Notice provides Duty Holders with information on what action to take.

To read the bulletin click on the link: http://www.hse.gov.uk/safetybulletins/use-of-barrier-glands.htm

About safety notices

Aim of bulletin: A safety notice is usually issued to facilitate a change in procedure or it requires an action to be undertaken to improve the level of protection or instruction in a potentially dangerous situation. It must be acted upon within a reasonable time, if a time period is not stated. It is not as immediate as a safety alert.

Safety notices are issued where, under certain circumstances, an unsafe situation could arise. For example, where instructions or labelling for use are not clear, additional guarding may be required, operating parameters or procedures need to be changed, where this could, in some cases, lead to an injury. Action should be taken although it may not need to be immediate.

When potentially dangerous equipment, process, procedures or substances have been identified, and depending on the probability of the incident reoccurring and the possible severity of the injuries, HSE may want to inform all users and other stakeholders of the situation and the steps that should be taken to rectify the fault via a safety notice. Safety notices will be issued after consultation with stakeholders and may result in industry-led notices being issued at the same time.

For more information, contact us on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk and we’ll be happy to help.

HSL/HSE CDM 2015 Training: the role of the Principal Designer

Dates and locations

  • 16 February 2016, ETC Venues, Maple House, 150 Corporation Street, Birmingham B4 6TB
  • 26 April 2016, ETC Venues, Marble Arch, Garfield House, 86 Edgware Road, London W2 2EA

Event overview

This event provides an introduction to this new role and is aimed at designers, clients, contractors and/or individuals who may take on, or want to understand the PD function, particularly for small to medium size projects. The course will be delivered by an ex-HSE Principal Construction Inspector with almost 40 years’ experience.

It will include:

  • An introduction and overview to CDM 2015 and the duties of the Principal Designer
  • The role of the construction client
  • The Principal Designer’s role in supporting the client
  • Obtaining and using pre-construction information
  • Appointment of designers and contractors
  • The Principal Designer’s role in ensuring designers comply with their duties
  • Exploring through case study discussion the key health and safety risks construction workers can face during construction and maintenance
  • Coordinating the flow of health and safety information
  • The role of the Principal Contractor and liaison with the PD
  • Preparing the health and safety file

By the end of the course, delegates will:

  • Understand the changes introduced by CDM 2015, the policy objectives behind them, and how the Regulations enable proportionate compliance dependent on project complexity
  • Know the role and duties of the Client, Principal Designer, designers, Principal Contractor, and contractors and the relationships and interfaces with the Principal Designer
  • Know the key health and safety risks faced by construction workers and those maintaining a structure
  • Understand the importance of pre-construction information, its limitations and the need for interpretation and further investigation in some circumstances
  • Understand the importance of achieving the effective communication of and use of design information
  • Understand how effective management, coordination and monitoring during the pre-construction phase can help to eliminate or reduce risks during the construction and life of the structure
  • As PDs, be better placed to make decisions on the relevancy of pre-construction and design information they should provide to PCs for construction phase health & safety plans, and relevant information for health and safety file

Who should attend?

This training is aimed at individuals and employees of organisations who meet the definition of designer and could be appointed as PD to be in control of the pre-construction phase of a project, and those who want to understand the duties of a Principal Designer as defined in CDM 2015.

This course is intended to provide an introduction and overview only to this new role and help delegates understand the actions that need to be taken to discharge the Principal Designer’s duties. It is not aimed at those involved in major projects or designed to establish or evaluate competence.

Information and booking

For the Birmingham event, a full programme and online booking form can be found on the HSL/HSE CDM 2015 Training (Birmingham) event page: http://www.hsl.gov.uk/health-and-safety-training-courses/the-construction-%28design-and-management%29-regulations-2015-%28cdm-2015%29—an-introduction-to-the-role-of-the-principal-designer—birmingham

For the London event, a full programme and online booking form can be found on the HSL/HSE CDM 2015 Training (London) event page: http://www.hsl.gov.uk/health-and-safety-training-courses/the-construction-%28design-and-management%29-regulations-2015-%28cdm-2015%29—an-introduction-to-the-role-of-the-principal-designer—london

Alternatively, you can email HSL Training at training@hsl.gsi.gov.uk or call 01298 218806.

Contains public sector information published by the Health and Safety Executive and licensed under the Open Government Licence

HEALTH & SAFETY NEWS UPDATE – 28TH JANUARY 2016

REGISTER BELOW-LEFT TO RECEIVE OUR UPDATES BY EMAIL

IN THIS UPDATE

Introduction

Legionella and Legionnaires’ disease – Council sentenced after legionella death at care home

Construction (Design and Management) Regulations (CDM 2015) and the entertainment industry

IOSH Managing Safely Refresher Course, 11th March, Stoke-on-Trent

Introduction

A couple of months ago, we shared HSE guidance on Legionella and Legionnaires’ disease, after an international engineering firm, which refurbishes turbine blades, was fined a total of £110,000 plus £77,252 costs for failing to manage the risk to public and employees of exposure to the potentially fatal bacteria. Since then, Reading Borough Council (RBC) has been fined £100,000 plus £20,000 costs following an investigation into the death of a pensioner who died from exposure to Legionella at a care home. We open this week’s update with more information and a link to the HSE guidance.

We’re also sharing guidance this week to help those in the entertainment industry understand what they need to do to comply with the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015). The UK events industry is worth £39.1 billion, with the biggest contributing segments in 2014 being conferences, meetings, exhibitions and trade fairs, taking place at approximately 10,000 venues, with an attendance of 85 million. Typical construction projects undertaken during events/productions include building outside broadcasts at sports events, building TV sets in studios, and touring theatre set builds.

And finally, we close this week’s update with details of an IOSH Managing Safely Refresher one-day course we’re running this March in Stoke-on-Trent. Delegates will get to refresh their knowledge on the key parts of the full Managing Safely course, plus there’s a much greater emphasis on monitoring, auditing and reviewing.

We hope you find our news updates useful. If you know of anyone who may benefit from reading them, please encourage them to register at the bottom-left of our news page (http://www.eljay.co.uk/news/) and we’ll email them a link each time an update is published. If in the unlikely event any difficulties are experienced whilst registering we’ll be more than happy to help and can be contacted on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk

Legionella and Legionnaires’ disease – council sentenced after legionella death at care home

A couple of months ago, we shared HSE guidance on Legionella and Legionnaires’ disease, after an international engineering firm, which refurbishes turbine blades, was fined a total of £110,000 plus £77,252 costs for failing to manage the risk to public and employees of exposure to the potentially fatal bacteria. (Click on the link to read the press release and guidance: http://www.eljay.co.uk/news/health-safety-news-update-3rd-december-2015/)

Since then, Reading Borough Council (RBC) has been fined following an investigation into the death of a pensioner who died from exposure to legionella.

During the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) prosecution, Reading Magistrates’ Court heard how the 95-year-old vulnerable gentleman arrived at the RBC operated care facility in September 2012.

He had previously been in hospital having suffered a broken leg and was attending the care home to receive intermediate care before returning to his own home.

However, during his stay he began feeling unwell, complaining of aches and pains including tightness of the chest, shortness of breath and difficulty in breathing. He was also suffering from nausea.

When he was re-admitted to hospital a sample proved positive for the presence of Legionella. He underwent treatment for Legionnaire’s disease, but died on 1 November 2012 from pneumonia related to legionella.

The prosecution said the control and management arrangements needed to ensure the risk from legionella is minimised, need to be robust. The court was told, prior to November 2012, RBC’s arrangements were not robust enough in a number of areas.

The Legionella training for the key personnel at the care home was significantly below the standard required. There were inadequate temperature checks and some of those done with respect to Thermostatic Mixer Valves (TMVs) were done incorrectly.

Showers were not descaled and disinfected quarterly as required; flushing of little used outlets was reliant on one member of staff and there was no procedure for this to be done in the absence of that member of staff.

HSE said the failings were systemic and continued over a period of time and there was a history of legionella problems at the home. The monitoring, checking and flushing tasks were given to the home’s handyman who was inadequately trained and supervised. There was no system in place to cover for him when he was away so that the requisite checks were not done.

Reading Borough Council, Civic Offices, Bridge Street, Reading admitted breaching Section 3(1) of Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and was fined £100,000 with £20,000 costs in Reading Crown Court.

After the hearing, HSE inspector Kelly Nichols said: “Reading Borough Council could and should have controlled the risk of exposure to legionella to the elderly and infirm as well as those receiving immediate care prior to returning home.

“RBC’s failings were systemic and continued over a period of time. There was a history of legionella problems at the home. The control and management arrangements were not robust and the legionella training of key personnel fell significantly below the required standard.

“The risks from legionella in nursing and care homes and the required control measures to manage those risks have been known and publicised in HSE publications since May 2000. It is really disappointing to find a local authority not managing those risks. It is important for all care providers to ensure they are managing the risks from hot and cold water systems with respect to both legionella and scalding risks especially due to likely exposure of more vulnerable people.”

For HSE guidance on controlling the risks from exposure to Legionella in man made water systems, click on the link: http://www.hse.gov.uk/legionnaires/. The information will help employers and those with responsibility for the control of premises, including landlords, understand what their duties are and how to comply with health and safety law.  It applies to premises controlled in connection with a trade, business or other undertaking where water is stored or used, and where there is a means of creating and transmitting breathable water droplets (aerosols), thus causing a reasonably foreseeable risk of exposure to legionella bacteria.

We carry out Legionella risk assessments of commercial and residential premises. For more information and/or a no-obligation quotation, contact us on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk.

Construction (Design and Management) Regulations (CDM 2015) and the entertainment industry

The UK events industry is worth £39.1 billion, with the biggest contributing segments in 2014 being conferences, meetings, exhibitions and trade fairs, taking place at approximately 10,000 venues, with an attendance of 85 million. Typical construction projects undertaken during events/productions include building outside broadcasts at sports events, building TV sets in studios, and touring theatre set builds.

We’re sharing guidance this week to help those in the entertainment industry understand what they need to do to comply with the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015).

What you should know

CDM 2015 is not about creating unnecessary bureaucracy. It is about securing the health, safety and welfare of those carrying out construction work and protecting others who the work may affect, from harm. With this principle in mind, this guidance illustrates how CDM roles and duties can be applied to existing common management arrangements and processes in the four main industry sub-sectors (click on the links for more information):

This will also help others in the industry, with different management arrangements, to determine what they need to do to comply with CDM.

Worked examples for typical construction projects in the event/production industry have been included, to show what proportionate compliance with CDM 2015 might look like in practise. Click on the link: http://www.hse.gov.uk/entertainment/cdm-2015/worked-examples.htm

This guidance should be read in conjunction with HSE’s L153: Managing health and safety in construction (http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/l153.htm)

The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 [CDM]

The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015) apply to all construction projects, including those undertaken in the entertainment industry. A project includes all the planning, design and management tasks associated with construction work. For example, the building, fitting out and taking down of temporary structures for TV, film and theatre productions and live events.

CDM 2015 makes the general duties of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 more specific. They complement the general Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 and integrate health and safety into the management of construction projects.

The aim is for construction health and safety considerations to be treated as a normal part of an event/production’s management and development, not an afterthought or bolt-on extra. In concert with wider measures taken to ensure a safer event/production, the objective of CDM 2015 is to reduce the risk of harm to those that have to build, fit out, use, maintain and take down structures.

The key principles of CDM 2015 will be familiar to those already managing risks effectively as part of an event/production. The key principles are:

  • eliminate or control risks so far as reasonably practicable;
  • (This means balancing the level of risk against the measures needed to control the real risk in terms of money, time or trouble. However, you do not need to take action if it would be grossly disproportionate to the level of risk)
  • ensure work is effectively planned;
  • appointing the right people and organisations at the right time;
  • making sure everyone has the information, instruction, training and supervision they need to carry out their jobs safely and without damaging health;
  • have systems in place to help parties cooperate and communicate with each other and coordinate their work; and
  • consult workers with a view to securing effective health, safety and welfare measures.

Any actions you take to comply with CDM 2015 should always be proportionate to the risks involved.

Find out more (click on the links)

For more information, visit the HSE web page http://www.hse.gov.uk/entertainment/cdm-2015/ or contact us on 07896 016380 and we’ll be happy to help.

 

IOSH Managing Safely Refresher Course, 11th March, Stoke-on-Trent

If you’ve taken the IOSH Managing Safely course within the last three years, you may be interested in the one-day Refresher course we’re running this March (Friday 11th) in Stoke-on-Trent (venue to be confirmed).

This is a practical and engaging one-day course that keeps employees’ Managing Safely training up to date. Not only will delegates get to refresh their knowledge on the key parts of the full Managing Safely course, there’s also a much greater emphasis on monitoring, auditing and reviewing, which is learned through two practical case studies.

Course detail

Key aspects of the course

  • Personal reflections
  • Refreshing your knowledge
  • Building on what you know
  • Putting managing safely into practice
  • Applying the management system

Assessment

  • Interactive quiz and discussions
  • Completion of a practical exercise based on the operations of a real business
  • Successful delegates are awarded an up-to-date IOSH Managing safely certificate

How the course delivery style suits you

  • Memorable and thought provoking facts and case studies help drive the points home over the whole course
  • Each module is backed by crystal clear examples and recognisable scenarios, and summaries reinforce the key learning points
  • The course includes checklists and other materials for delegates to try out and then use when they get back to their own workplaces
  • Little ‘down time’ – the programme can be delivered flexibly so that it suits your business
  • Efficient and effective learning – health, safety and environmental basics are covered in a single programme

Business benefits

  • Greater productivity as fewer hours are lost due to sickness and accidents
  • Improved company-wide safety awareness culture and appreciation for safety measures
  • Active staff involvement to improve the workplace
  • Nationally recognised and respected certification for managers and supervisors
  • Enhanced reputation within the supply chain

For delegates to be eligible to take the Refresher course, they must do so within three years of completing their Managing Safely course.

The course fee is £145 plus VAT, which includes lunch and certification.

For more information, or to book a place, please contact us on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk. We provide a wide range of training courses, and our brochure can be downloaded from the Training page on our website (http://www.eljay.co.uk/health-and-safety-training-and-courses.php)

Contains public sector information published by the Health and Safety Executive and licensed under the Open Government Licence

 

 

HEALTH & SAFETY NEWS UPDATE – 19TH NOVEMBER 2015

REGISTER BELOW-LEFT TO RECEIVE OUR UPDATES BY EMAIL

IN THIS UPDATE

Introduction

Chief Inspector challenges small construction sites to act now to manage workers health and safety

Crowd management – your duties as an event organiser

Managing risks from skin exposure at work

Introduction

This autumn saw the HSE’s 10th annual refurbishment inspection initiative, and after 46% of sites fell below standards, the Chief Inspector of Construction is challenging the refurbishment industry to act now and protect their workers. As well as serving 692 enforcement notices and 983 notifications of contravention, inspectors had to deal with immediate risks such as falls from height (the most common killer in the industry), and exposure to silica dust and asbestos. This week we open our update with HSE guidance on managing construction sites safely.

As the festive season rapidly approaches, we hear that this year’s Christmas lights switch-on in Solihull has been cancelled amid health and safety fears arising from the size of crowds expected to attend. In 2009 approximately 60 people were injured during a crowd-surge at such an event in Birmingham. So we’re also sharing HSE guidance this week on crowd management – specifically aimed at those responsible for organising events such as these.

And finally, we look at the risks from skin exposure at work – how many materials used can affect the skin or pass through the skin, causing diseases elsewhere in the body – and how these can be prevented.

We hope you find our news updates useful. If you know of anyone who may benefit from reading them, please encourage them to register at the bottom-left of our news page (http://www.eljay.co.uk/news/) and we’ll email them a link each time an update is published. If in the unlikely event any difficulties are experienced whilst registering we’ll be more than happy to help and can be contacted on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk

Chief Inspector challenges small construction sites to act now to manage workers health and safety

The Health and Safety Executive’s (HSE’s) Chief Inspector of Construction is challenging the refurbishment industry to act now and protect their workers, after 46 per cent of sites fell below standards during a recent inspection initiative.

HSE targeted small refurbishment sites during the month long drive and 692 enforcement notices and 983 notifications of contravention had to be served where there was a material breach of health and/or safety. Inspectors had to deal with immediate risks, such as work at height, and also to deal with sites where workers were being exposed to silica dust and asbestos, which cause long term health problems.

Health and safety breaches were also followed up with clients and designers, reinforcing their duties under the Construction Design and Management Regulations (CDM) 2015 and help them understand their responsibilities.

Despite the high rate of enforcement action, the inspectors found a number of examples of good practice.

Peter Baker, Health and Safety Executive’s Chief Inspector of Construction said: “It is disappointing that some small refurbishment sites are still cutting corners and not properly protecting their workers. Falls from height are the most common killer in the industry but we still found workers put at risk to save minutes on the job – believing it wouldn’t happen to them.

“The mis-conception that health issues cannot be controlled is simply not true and ruining people’s lives. Harmful dust, whether silica or wood, is a serious issue and can be managed effectively with the right design, equipment and training. Health effects may not be immediate but the ultimate impact on workers and their families can be devastating. Each week 100 construction workers die from occupational disease.”

“HSE inspectors found lots of good examples of small sites carrying out work safely, proving it can be done. Larger construction sites accepted the challenge a few years ago and have made big improvements, which all of the industry can learn from. My message to smaller businesses is don’t wait for an accident or visit from an inspector before you make the change, but act now and learn from your colleagues’ example.”

How to manage your site safely (click on the links)

For more guidance on health and safety in the construction industry, visit the HSE web page http://www.hse.gov.uk/construction/ or contact us on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk, and we’ll be happy to help.

Crowd management – your duties as an event organiser

Solihull’s Christmas lights switch-on has been cancelled this year amid health and safety fears arising from the size of crowds expected to attend. In 2009 approximately 60 people were injured during a crowd-surge at such an event in Birmingham.

As an organiser you must as far as reasonably practicable ensure the safety of visiting crowds.

While certain aspects of crowd safety can be allocated to contractors, for example stewarding, you will retain overall responsibility for ensuring the safety of the public.

What you should know

Hazards presented by a crowd:

  • Crushing between people.
  • Crushing against fixed structures, such as barriers.
  • Trampling underfoot.
  • Surging, swaying or rushing.
  • Aggressive behaviour.
  • Dangerous behaviour, such as climbing on equipment or throwing objects.

Hazards presented by a venue:

  • Slipping or tripping due to inadequately lit areas or poorly maintained floors and the build-up of rubbish.
  • Moving vehicles sharing the same route as pedestrians.
  • Collapse of a structure, such as a fence or barrier, which falls onto the crowd.
  • People being pushed against objects, such as unguarded, hot cooking equipment on a food stall.
  • Objects, such as stalls, that obstruct movement and cause congestion during busy periods.
  • Crowd movements obstructed by people queuing at bars etc.
  • Cross flows as people cut through the crowd to get to other areas, such as toilets.
  • Failure of equipment, such as turnstiles.
  • Sources of fire, such as cooking equipment.

Assessing the risks and putting controls in place

Carry out an assessment of the risks arising from crowd movement and behaviour as they arrive, leave and move around the site.

Note: Whether health and safety law will apply on routes to and from the venue will largely depend on the circumstances (other legislation to do with Licensing and traffic law may take precedence). If health and safety law does apply, an organiser’s legal duty regarding crowd safety will depend on the extent of control they have, which should be judged on a case-by-case basis. These duties are likely to be shared with others, including the local authority, landowners and transport providers.

Find out more

To assist you in identifying measures to help keep people safe see Managing crowds safely: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsg154.htm

Barriers

Barriers at events serve several purposes, eg:

  • as an aid to manage and influence the behaviour of the audience; to line routes; and to prevent the audience climbing on top of temporary structures and putting themselves at risk of falling
  • to relieve and prevent overcrowding and the build-up of audience pressure
  • to provide physical security, as in the case of a high-perimeter fence at an outdoor event
  • to shield hazards from people

If you decide to use barriers and fencing as a crowd management tool, then they should be risk assessed. Depending on the complexity of the risk and barrier/s, you may need a source of competent advice to help you.

The factors you should take into account include:

  • the planned use of barriers
  • layout
  • ground conditions and topography
  • the presence of underground services, eg water pipes, electric cables that could restrict the use of pins to secure barriers
  • weather
  • load on the barrier – wind and/or crowd pressure
  • audience numbers and behaviour

These and any other factors peculiar to the location will determine the type of barrier or fence you select. It is crucial that the type of barrier and fence does not present greater risks than those they are intended to control. In some cases, barriers have failed due to incorrect selection.

To install simple barriers like rope and posts is relatively straightforward. However, for more complex barrier arrangements like stage barriers you may need a competent contractor to do this for you.

Deploy barriers and fencing with proper crowd management procedures, eg use of stewards to help achieve an all-round effective management of the risk. If appropriate, consult with a crowd management director on the use of barriers.

Find out more (click on the links)

For clarification or more information, please don’t hesitate to contact us on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk, and we’ll be happy to help.

Managing risks from skin exposure at work

Many materials used at work can affect the skin or can pass through the skin and cause diseases elsewhere in the body. If you are an employer, health and safety adviser, trainer or safety representative, this book (free to download by clicking on the link: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsg262.htm) provides guidance to help you prevent these disabling diseases.

It covers the protective role of the skin, ill health arising from skin exposure, recognising potential skin exposure in your workplace, and managing skin exposure to prevent disease.

There is guidance on assessing and managing risks, reducing contact with harmful materials, choosing the right protective equipment and skin care products, and checking for early signs of skin disease.

The document also contains a series of case studies drawn from a wide range of industries.

Related resources (click on the links)

See also

For clarification or more information, please don’t hesitate to contact us on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk, and we’ll be happy to help.

Contains public sector information published by the Health and Safety Executive and licensed under the Open Government Licence

 

HEALTH & SAFETY NEWS UPDATE – 22ND OCTOBER 2015

REGISTER BELOW-LEFT TO RECEIVE OUR UPDATES BY EMAIL

IN THIS UPDATE

Introduction

Frequently asked questions – Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015

Upper Limb Disorders (ULDs) – assessment of repetitive tasks of the upper limbs (the ART tool)

PPE – are turban-wearing Sikhs exempt from the need to wear head protection in the workplace?

Introduction

Since The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015) came into force on 6 April 2015, replacing CDM 2007, we have received a number of queries in relation to this major legislative development, so we thought it would be useful this week to open our update with the HSE’s latest answers to the most frequently asked questions on this topic.

Do your work tasks involve guiding or holding tools, keyboard work or heavy lifting? If so, these have been reported by GPs as being the most likely work-related causes of Upper Limb Disorders (ULDs), for which a prevalence rate of approximately 200,000 total cases was reported amongst people working in the 12 months between 2013/14, resulting in a total of 3.2 million lost working days – an average of almost 16 days per worker (see http://www.hse.gov.uk/statistics/causdis/musculoskeletal/msd.pdf). This week, we also share details of the HSE ART tool (assessment of repetitive tasks of the upper limbs) – available as a free download, allowing you to complete your own assessment of repetitive tasks in your workplace.

And finally, we close with news that turban-wearing Sikhs are now legally exempt from the need to wear head protection not only on construction sites, but also in the workplace of any industry (with limited exceptions).

We hope you find our news updates useful. If you know of anyone who may benefit from reading them, please encourage them to register at the bottom-left of our news page (http://www.eljay.co.uk/news/) and we’ll email them a link each time an update is published. If in the unlikely event any difficulties are experienced whilst registering we’ll be more than happy to help and can be contacted on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk

Frequently asked questions – Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015

Notifications – F10’s

When is a construction project ‘notifiable’?

A construction project is notifiable if the construction work is expected to:

  • last longer than 30 working days and have more than 20 workers working at the same time at any point on the project; or
  • exceed 500 person days.

Find out how to notify projects, and complete the f10 notification form (click on the link): https://www.hse.gov.uk/forms/notification/f10.htm

Does the 30 working days/500 person days on site include weekends, bank holidays etc?

Every day on which construction work is likely to be carried out should be counted, even if the work on that day is of a short duration. This includes holidays and weekends.

Who should notify a project?

The client has the duty to notify a construction project. In practice however, the client may ask someone else to notify on their behalf.

Maintenance

Does CDM 2015 apply to all maintenance work?

No. The definition of construction work has not changed under CDM 2015. The application to maintenance work remains the same as it was under CDM 2007.

Principal Designer (PD)

I was a CDM co-ordinator under CDM 2007. Can I now work as a principal designer (PD)?

No, not necessarily. To work as a PD, you must be a designer:

  • You might be an architect, consulting engineer, quantity surveyor or anyone who specifies and alters designs as part of their work.
  • You might also be a contractor/builder, commercial client, tradesperson or anyone who carries out design work, or arranges for or instructs people under your control to do so.

You must have the right mix of skills, knowledge, experience and (if an organisation) organisational capability to allow you to carry out all of the functions and responsibilities of a PD for the project in hand, and be in control of the pre-construction phase.

I was an architect/designer on the planning and Building Regulations stages of a project and I am no longer involved with the project. Who will take on the role of principal designer (PD)?

The client has the duty to appoint the PD. If you are no longer involved with the project, the client must appoint another PD. You will still be responsible for the design decisions you made in preparing the original plans. The new PD must then take responsibility for any design decisions made following their appointment.

If the client fails to appoint the PD, then the client assumes the role.

I’m a client, can I take on the Principal Designer (PD) role?

Yes. You can choose to take on the PD role yourself. If you do you must have the skills, knowledge, experience and(if an organisation) organisational capability, to carry out all the functions and responsibilities of the PD.

Small builder

I am a general builder who only works on small scale commercial and domestic projects, will CDM 2015 affect me?

Yes. CDM 2015 applies to all construction work including domestic projects.

You will have different responsibilities depending on whether you are (for example):

  • The only contractor working on the job;
  • The principal contractor;
  • One of the contactors workings for a PC.

For more information, please go to ‘Are You a small builder…’ (click on the link): http://www.hse.gov.uk/construction/areyou/builder.htm

Construction Phase Plan (CPP)

As a general builder do I need a Construction Phase Plan (CPP) for any construction work I do?

Yes. If you are the only contactor or the principal contractor (PC), you must draw up a Construction Phase Plan (CPP): http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cis80.pdf. However, it should be proportionate to the size and scale of the job.

A simple plan before the work starts is usually enough to show that you have thought about health and safety.

If you are a contractor working for a PC, it is the PC who must draw up the CPP.

To help you draw up a CPP for small scale projects, please go to the template CPP (click on the link): http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cis80.pdf, or the CDM Wizard (click on the link): http://www.citb.co.uk/health-safety-and-other-topics/health-safety/construction-design-and-management-regulations/cdm-wizard-app/, a free to download smartphone app produced by the Construction Industry Training Board (CITB).

Self build

I want to build my own house, does CDM 2015 apply to me?

To find out, go to The Self Build Portal (click on the link): http://www.selfbuildportal.org.uk/healthandsafety.

Miscellaneous

Can I carry out the role of more than one CDM duty holder on a project?

Yes. Whether you are an individual or an organisation (client, designer, principal designer, contractor or principal contractor), you can carry out the role of more than one duty holder.  You must have the skills, knowledge, experience and (if an organisation) the organisational capability to carry out all of the functions and responsibilities of each role in a way that secures health and safety.

For further information, visit the HSE web page http://www.hse.gov.uk/construction/cdm/2015/index.htm or contact us on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk, and we’ll be more than happy to help.

Upper Limb Disorders (ULDs) – assessment of repetitive tasks of the upper limbs (the ART tool)

The assessment of repetitive tasks (ART) tool is designed to help you risk assess tasks that require repetitive moving of the upper limbs (arms and hands). It helps you assess some of the common risk factors in repetitive work that contribute to the development of upper limb disorders (ULDs).

It is aimed at those responsible for designing, assessing, managing and inspecting repetitive work. It can help identify those tasks that involve significant risks and where to focus risk-reduction measures. It will be useful to employers, safety representatives, health and safety practitioners, consultants and ergonomists.

It includes an assessment guide, a flow chart, a task description form and a score sheet. Further information on ART, including online training on how to use the tool is also available (click on the link): http://www.hse.gov.uk/msd/uld/art/index.htm

Free guidance for employers can be downloaded by clicking on the link: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg438.pdf or contact us on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk, and we’ll be more than happy to help.

PPE – are turban-wearing Sikhs exempt from the need to wear head protection in the workplace?

Yes. Sections 11 and 12 of the Employment Act 1989 (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1989/38/section/11) as amended by Section 6 of the Deregulation Act 2015 (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2015/20/section/6/enacted) exempts turban-wearing Sikhs from any legal requirement to wear head protection at a workplace. A workplace is defined broadly and means any place where work is undertaken including any private dwelling, vehicle, aircraft, installation or moveable structure (including construction sites).

There is a limited exception for particularly dangerous and hazardous tasks performed by individuals working in occupations which involve providing an urgent response to an emergency where a risk assessment has identified that head protection is essential for the protection of the individual eg such as a fire fighter entering a burning building, dealing with hazardous materials.

The exemption applies only to head protection and Sikhs are required to wear all other necessary personal protective equipment required under the Personal Protective Equipment Regulations 1992. The exemption does not differentiate between employees and other turban-wearing Sikhs that may be in the workplace, eg visitors. However, it applies solely to members of the Sikh religion and only those Sikhs that wear a turban.

Employers are still required to take all necessary actions to avoid injury from falling objects by putting in place such safe systems of work, control measures and engineering solutions eg restricting access to areas where this may be an issue. Where a turban-wearing Sikh chooses not to wear the head protection provided, the exemption includes a limitation on the liability of the duty-holder should an incident occur.

For general guidance on Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), visit the HSE web page http://www.hse.gov.uk/toolbox/ppe.htm or contact us on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk, and we’ll be more than happy to help.

Contains public sector information published by the Health and Safety Executive and licensed under the Open Government Licence

 

 

HEALTH & SAFETY NEWS UPDATE – 27TH AUGUST 2015

IN THIS UPDATE

Introduction

Self-employed – do I have duties?

Business case studies

Safety Alert – ‘Norfolk Range’ large wheeled dry powder fire extinguishers manufactured before 2009 by UK Fire International Ltd

Links to guidance on CDM 2015

Introduction

With the late summer bank holiday in striking distance, there’s no getting away from the fact that Autumn is on the horizon. And our typical British wet weather is not the only thing to have dampened our spirits over the summer months. Tragic incidents such as the Bosley Wood Flour Mill explosion and Shoreham Airshow crash have brought health and safety very much into the public eye. With investigations ongoing, the causes remain to be seen, but could possibly result in a criminal inquiry at the flour mill if evidence of negligence is found. According to an HSE press release (http://press.hse.gov.uk/2015/further-hse-enforcement-notices-issued-at-bosley-wood-flour-mill/), a Prohibition Notice has been served on the mill owners, “preventing work activities until the issues identified involving the processing and bagging of large amounts of paper dust in one of the sheds on site, have been resolved”. In their guidance document “Safe handling of combustible dusts – Precautions against explosions”(http://www.hse.gov.uk/pUbns/priced/hsg103.pdf), the HSE advises that dusts produced by many materials we use everyday are flammable, and, in the form of a cloud, can explode.

Are you self-employed? From 1 October 2015, if your work activity poses no potential risk to the health and safety of other workers or members of the public, then health and safety law will not apply to you. If you don’t know whether or not your work activity falls into this category, more information is provided below.

Do you want to know how other businesses manage health and safety? The latest suite of HSE business case studies below provides links to a variety of video and narrative case studies of businesses doing just that, effectively and proportionately, with the help of online HSE guidance.

Do your work activities involve manufacturing, warehousing or engineering? Then you may be familiar with large dry powder fire extinguishers, which are the subject of HSE’s latest safety alert.

Finally, and following on from our previous news updates on CDM 2015, we close this week with links to the following guidance:

  • L153 – Managing health and safety in construction – CDM 2015: Guidance on Regulations
  • INDG411 – Need building work done? A short guide for clients on CDM 2015 (rev)
  • Construction Phase Plan for small projects (CDM 2015) – CIS80
  • Industry guidance for dutyholders
  • CITB CDM wizard app for construction phase plan

We hope you find our news updates useful. If you know of anyone who may benefit from reading them, please encourage them to register at the bottom-left of our news page (http://www.eljay.co.uk/news/) and we’ll email them a link each time an update is published. If in the unlikely event any difficulties are experienced whilst registering we’ll be more than happy to help and can be contacted on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk

Self-employed – do I have duties?

In 2011, the Löfstedt Review link to external website recommended that those self-employed whose work activities pose no potential risk of harm to others should be exempt from health and safety law. This recommendation was accepted by Government.

So, from 1 October 2015, if you are self-employed and your work activity poses no potential risk to the health and safety of other workers or members of the public, then health and safety law will not apply to you.

HSE estimates that health and safety law will no longer apply to 1.7 million self-employed people like novelists, journalists, graphic designers, accountants, confectioners, financial advisors and online traders.

What the law says

The Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 (General Duties of Self-Employed Persons) (Prescribed Undertakings) Regulations 2015 (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukdsi/2015/9780111136980), says:

  • if your work activity is specifically mentioned in the regulations above
  • or if your work activity poses a risk to the health and safety of others, then the law applies to you

What is meant by ‘self-employed’?

For health and safety law purposes, ‘self-employed’ means that you do not work under a contract of employment (http://www.hse.gov.uk/enforce/enforcementguide/investigation/status-contract.htm) and work only for yourself.

If you’re self-employed and employ others the law will apply to you. You may be self-employed for tax purposes, but this may not be so for health and safety. This is a complex area and HMRC have produced employment status guidance (https://www.gov.uk/working-for-yourself/what-counts-as-self-employed).

What is a ‘risk to the health and safety of others’?

This is the likelihood of someone else being harmed or injured (eg members of the public, clients, contractors etc) as a consequence of your work activity.

Most self-employed people will know if their work poses a risk to the health and safety of others. You must consider the work you are doing and judge for yourself if it creates a risk or not.

For example if you operate a fairground ride for the public to use then your work could affect the health and safety of other people and you must take appropriate steps to protect them as the law will apply to you.

Find out more about ‘risk’

HSE guidance on risk management (http://www.hse.gov.uk/risk/index.htm) explains more about the risks your work activity may create and how best to manage these.

High risk activities

The law says that there are certain work activities where the law applies because they are high risk. If your work involves any of these activities, then the law will apply to you:

  • Agriculture
  • Construction
  • Gas
  • Railways
  • Asbestos
  • GMOs

For more information visit the self-employed workers guidance topic page on the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/self-employed/index.htm or contact us on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk and we’ll be more than happy to help.

Business case studies

This is the latest suite of HSE business case studies, where businesses tell their stories of how they manage health and safety effectively and proportionately and how online HSE guidance helps them to do this.

Two of the case studies focus primarily on leadership, while the others describe examples of health and safety management in SMEs.

The video case studies were produced in collaboration with 3rd year Film Production and Media students from Edge Hill University in West Lancashire.

Video case studies

Bootle Containers Ltd

Bootle Containers is a medium sized manufacturing company with 55 employees, specialising in design and production of containers.  This film describes the company’s health and safety management systems and why they think good health and safety is good for business.

Link to video: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/bootle-containers.htm

Lamont Cleaning and Support Services

Lamont is a small company of 15 employees, specialising in commercial and industrial window cleaning. This film shows how they work with their employees to manage health and safety.

Link to video: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/lamont-cleaning.htm

Laser Quest Stourbridge

Laser Quest Stourbridge is a hi tech gaming centre with 11 employees. This film describes how the owner manages the company’s health and safety.

Link to video: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/laser-quest.htm

Merseytravel

Merseytravel is the strategic transport authority for the Liverpool City Region, with 850 employees. This film tells how effective leadership and employee engagement improved health and safety performance.

Link to video: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/merseytravel.htm

Mount Anvil Ltd

Mount Anvil is a medium sized construction and development company based in London. In this film, senior leaders from the company describe how they manage health and safety and why it is so important to their business.

Link to video: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/mount-anvil.htm

Narrative case studies

Applied Industrial Systems Ltd.

Applied Industrial Systems Ltd (AIS) specialises in the creation and provision of software and control systems to a diverse client base across the transport, infrastructure and manufacturing sectors.

Link to case study: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/ais.htm

Connors Building & Restoration Services Ltd.

Connors Building & Restoration Services is an asset management company with 33 employees, specialising in building services, ground maintenance and inspection.

Link to case study: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/connors-building.htm

Loop Technology Ltd.

Loop Technology is a small, family run business with 21 employees, specialising in industrial automation.

Link to case study: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/loop.htm

Technicraft (Anglia) Ltd

Technicraft is a metal fabrication company with 25 employees. It provides services including laser cutting, punching, presswork and welding.

Link to case study: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/casestudy/technicraft.htm

More narrative case studies for SMEs and larger businesses can be found by visiting the Business case studies page on the HSE website: http://www.hse.gov.uk/business/case-studies.htm?ebul=hsegen&cr=2/27-jul-15 or contact us for advice and guidance on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk, and we’ll be more than happy to help.

Safety Alert – ‘Norfolk Range’ large wheeled dry powder fire extinguishers manufactured before 2009 by UK Fire International Ltd

Issue Date

12 August 2015

Target Audience

All premises where large dry powder fire extinguishers are likely to be used for example: chemical industry, offshore industry, merchant shipping, nuclear industry, manufacturing, mining, warehousing, engineering, metals and minerals processing and production.

Key Issues

‘Norfolk Range’ large dry powder fire extinguishers, manufactured before 2009, may be affected by moisture ingress at a threaded joint at the base of the unit, rendering the unit inoperable. The problem may not be identified during routine service inspections.

  • Users should identify if their extinguishers are likely to be affected. If yes and the extinguisher has been left exposed to adverse conditions since its last extended service, the condition of the elbow joint at the base of the unit should be examined by a competent service engineer.
  • If you are unsure if your extinguishers are affected by this safety alert, consult Britannia Fire Ltd.
  • Service engineers should closely examine, and if necessary, remove the elbow to confirm if there is evidence of water ingress to the discharge tube. If there is any doubt about moisture affecting the powder in the discharge tube, consider subjecting the extinguisher to an extended service including full replacement of the dry powder.

For more information click on the link: http://www.hse.gov.uk/safetybulletins/norfolk-large-wheeled-dry-powder-fire-extinguishers.htm or contact us on 07896 016380 or at Fiona@eljay.co.uk, and we’ll be more than happy to help.

Links to guidance on CDM 2015

L153 – Managing health and safety in construction – CDM 2015: Guidance on Regulations

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/l153.htm?ebul=gd-cons/jul15&cr=2

INDG411 – Need building work done? A short guide for clients on CDM 2015 (rev)

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg411.htm?ebul=gd-cons/jul15&cr=3

Construction Phase Plan for small projects (CDM 2015) – CIS80

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cis80.pdf?ebul=gd-cons/jul15&cr=4

Industry guidance for dutyholders

http://www.citb.co.uk/health-safety-and-other-topics/health-safety/construction-design-and-management-regulations/cdm-guidance-documents/

CITB CDM wizard app for construction phase plan

http://www.citb.co.uk/health-safety-and-other-topics/health-safety/construction-design-and-management-regulations/cdm-wizard-app/

Please note that the HSE are starting to remove the current CDM 2007 web pages and plan to remove them all by October 2015.

Contains public sector information published by the Health and Safety Executive and licensed under the Open Government Licence

Also contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.

 

HEALTH & SAFETY NEWS UPDATE – 6TH AUGUST 2015

IN THIS UPDATE

Introduction

CDM 2015 Principal Designer Role – FAQs

Powered Gates

Cutting Red Tape – The Government wants you to tell them which regulatory issues hamper your business

HSE and HMRC working together for you – growing your business

Introduction

It’s been four months now since The Construction (Design & Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015) came into force, replacing CDM 2007. As virtually everyone involved in a construction project has legal duties under the regulations, it’s not surprising that the HSE has received many enquiries since the change, including those about the role of the principal designer (PD), and we open this week’s update with the HSE’s answers to some of these questions.

Following the deaths five years ago of two children after becoming trapped in powered gates, the HSE issued the following safety notices (click on the links):

http://www.hse.gov.uk/safetybulletins/electricgates.htm

http://www.hse.gov.uk/safetybulletins/electricgates2.htm

Whilst, thankfully, there have been no similar reports since then (as far as we are aware), a research report recently published by the HSE has highlighted several safety related inadequacies in the design of powered gates and so this week we’re looking at the responsibilities of those whose role it is to ensure that powered (automatic) doors and gates on their premises are safe.

Is your business hampered by regulations? Whilst we join the HSE in encouraging a “common sense” approach to health and safety, we’re certainly aware of constraints faced by our clients when trying to comply with regulations. RIDDOR (Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013) is a common example. Of course we’re happy to help, where we can, in helping clients overcome these issues but we welcome the move by the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) in launching a new twitter account to encourage business, and in particular, small business, to highlight issues they have.

Additional issues/concerns are faced by small businesses as they start to grow or take on more employees, and HMRC and the Health and Safety Executive are working together to deliver a live webinar about the typical situations likely to be faced. You can find out more about/register for this at the close of this update.

Our next update will be published at the end of this month, after which we’ll keep you updated on a weekly basis. But if you have any queries in the meantime, please don’t hesitate to contact us on 07896 016380, at Fiona@eljay.co.uk or via our website. Alternatively, check out the HSE website (http://www.hse.gov.uk/) where you’ll be able to find the answers to many frequently asked questions.

CDM 2015 Principal Designer Role – FAQs

The Health & Safety Executive (HSE) has received many enquires on The Construction (Design & Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015) and they will be updating their web pages (http://www.hse.gov.uk/construction/cdm/2015/index.htm) with further information in due course.

In the meantime, here are a couple of answers to some frequently asked questions about the role of the principal designer (PD).

Who can carry out the role of the principal designer (PD)? 

The PD must be a designer – an architect, consulting engineer or quantity surveyor, or anyone who specifies and alters designs as part of their work.  They can also be clients, contractors and trades people if they carry out design work or arrange for or instruct persons under their control to do so.

They must have the right mix of skills, knowledge and experience (SKE) or organisational capability to carry out all the functions and responsibilities assigned to them in Regulations 11 and 12 and have control over the pre-construction phase.

Commonly, the PD is likely to be:

For larger projects – a design practice or a technical department of a principal contractor e.g. a principal contractor doing design and build;

For smaller projects – a self-employed architect/technician, small design practice, a project management company, a client’s internal estates management team, or even a specialist tradesperson such as an electrician where they lead on the design function;

So long as they meet the criteria of;

– being a designer;

– having the relevant SKE or organisational capability, and;

– being in control of the pre-construction phase.

Does CDM 2015 require the principal designer to be a member of the project design team? 

No.  The PD must be appointed by the client as soon as it is established that more than one contractor is or is likely to be working on the project to plan, manage, monitor and control the design stages.

If the client gets it right and appoints the PD early at the concept stage, then the appointment should commonly take place before the project design team has been fully identified or assembled.

The PD may provide their own design team, appoint a team or manage and control any team appointed by others.

Whatever the model, which provides maximum flexibility for the client, – the PD must be able to prove to the client that they have the SKE or organisational capability to fulfil all the functions – proportionate to the nature, size, complexity and risk profile of the project.  Once in place, the PD should be in control of the design team so that they, and the design team, can carry out their roles effectively.

Can a client carry out the role of the principal designer? 

Yes. If a client fails to, or decides not to appoint a PD the law provides that the PD role is automatically assigned to the client.

Many clients will choose to take on the PD role themselves but irrespective of whether by choice or otherwise, the client must have the SKE or organisational capability to fulfil all the PD functions and responsibilities effectively.

Powered Gates

In the light of recently published HSE research report RR1056 – ‘Critical analysis of safety related design of powered gates’ – which highlights several safety-related inadequacies and suggests alternative safety measures, those whose role it is to ensure that powered (automatic) doors and gates on their premises are safe, may be seeking clarification of their responsibilities.

The HSE web page ‘Powered gates’ (http://www.hse.gov.uk/work-equipment-machinery/powered-gates/introduction.htm) provides information and guidance (including the following – click on the links for more info) for safety on the design, construction, supply, and use, inspection, examination and maintenance of powered gates:

Basics on risks, safety and the law (http://www.hse.gov.uk/work-equipment-machinery/powered-gates/basics.htm)

Risks from powered gates

Powered gates can give rise to a number of significant hazards, including those from being:

– hit by the moving gate

– crushed against fixed and / or other moving parts

– trapped between fixed, moving and other parts

– caught on moving parts, eg gears

– electrocuted, as most are powered by electric motors, or controlled electrically

– affected by hydraulic or pneumatic parts, where these are present

Responsibilities of designers, manufacturers, installers, owners, repairers, etc (http://www.hse.gov.uk/work-equipment-machinery/powered-gates/responsibilities.htm)

Owners, occupiers and users

While the responsibility for safe design / construction and installation may rest with others, the owner / user should ensure that the installed product is safe, and kept safe. In particular they should study the User Instructions that must come with the product, assessing what servicing and inspection / safety checks may be necessary.

More on Safety by design/construction, when in use, or following maintenance (http://www.hse.gov.uk/work-equipment-machinery/powered-gates/safety.htm)

Maintaining for safety

Component parts can wear and fail, sometimes catastrophically. Like most machinery, powered doors and gates need to be maintained to remain safe. Powered gates forming parts of workplaces or in common parts of residential complexes will be subject to health and safety law. Owners, occupiers, landlords and managing agents will have on-going responsibilities for the safety of all users and all those who may encounter the gate.

Powered Gate FAQs (http://www.hse.gov.uk/work-equipment-machinery/faq-powered-gates.htm)

What are the risks with powered (automatic) doors and gates, and how can they be controlled?

What if I think a gate is unsafe?

I’m a domestic householder, do I have to do anything?

I own a commercial/industrial premises, what do I have to do?

I install doors and gates, what must I do?

As a maintenance contractor, what do I have to do?

What are the main safety requirements for these machines?

What does the law say?

Where can I get more information?

Our comment

We check the operation of powered gates when carrying out health & safety inspections of commercial and residential property. Optical/stop sensors should operate satisfactorily, and confirmation should be provided that the gates have been risk assessed and are maintained by a suitably qualified contractor in order to meet current legislative requirements.

Cutting Red Tape – The Government wants you to tell them which regulatory issues hamper your business

The Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) have launched a new twitter account to encourage business, and in particular, small business, to highlight issues they have with regulation. BIS are keen to promote this account to help engage and better understand the regulatory concerns of business, and to hear it direct from them.

You can get involved by:

– Following @CutRedTapeUK for discussion on Twitter

– Remembering to use the hashtag #cutredtape in your tweets

– Share information on how small business can grow through your social media channels, tweet using #cutredtape

– Do you have a newsletter, online group or forum? Encourage discussion about regulatory issues and share feedback.

Our comment

We’re on Twitter too! We’re following @CutRedTapeUK, and you can follow us at @Eljay_Risk_Mgmt to stay up to date with health & safety news and our range of support and training services.

HSE and HMRC working together for you – growing your business

If your business is growing and you have questions on health and safety and taking on new employees, you can find answers in a live webinar delivered by HSE and HMRC.

Webinar overview

As your business starts to grow or you take on more employees you’ll face new issues and concerns. HMRC and the Health and Safety Executive are working together to deliver a live webinar about the typical situations you are likely to face. It looks at some of the questions you may have and guides you through the answers.

Webinar dates (click on the links to register)

12 August 2015, 10am – https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4319267968957115650

16 September 2015, 10am – https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6473058415654087938

13 October 2015, 10am – https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/30011536368234241

Once you have registered the webinar organizer will communicate with you regarding these events.

Our comment

Of course we’re always available to answer any questions you may have about health and safety. Contact us on 07896 016380, at Fiona@eljay.co.uk or via our website.

Contains public sector information published by the Health and Safety Executive and licensed under the Open Government Licence

Also contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.

HEALTH & SAFETY NEWS UPDATE – 23RD JULY 2015

IN THIS UPDATE:

Introduction

New & Changed Legislation & Regulations

• The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015)
• Landlords will be required by law to install working smoke and carbon monoxide alarms in their properties
• Drugs and driving: the law
• Simpler explosives and acetylene regulations
• Storing petrol safely

New & Revised Guidance

Guidance Documents
• A guide to workplace transport safety
• The selection, management and use of mobile elevating work platforms

Web Pages
• Dust Hub
• Illness caused by welding fume and gases
• COSHH e-tool
• Health and safety for disabled people
• Noise and Vibration Partnership Group
• IOSH – No time to lose

Introduction

To coincide with the launch of our new website, we’re changing the way we keep our readers up to date with health & safety news, and the support and training services we provide.

From now on, we’ll be posting weekly updates to this page, and you can register below-left to receive email notifications of these. If you experience any difficulty with this, please send an email to fiona@eljay.co.uk with your user name and email address, and we’ll register your details for you. Each time an update is published, you’ll receive an email containing a link to the post which you can then view, share and/or print off. You can unsubscribe at any time, and each email will contain an unsubscription link for this purpose.

This week, we’re focussing on health & safety legislation and regulations that have changed or been introduced since the last quarter of 2014, as well as providing an overview of new and revised guidance. Next week, we’ll be de-bunking a few myths and sharing what’s new in the world of health & safety.

New & Changed Legislation & Regulations

The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015)

The Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015) came into force in April 2015, replacing CDM 2007. So what do you need to do? Virtually everyone involved in a construction project has legal duties under CDM 2015. These ‘dutyholders’ are defined as follows.

Client – Anyone who has construction work carried out for them. The main duty for clients is to make sure their project is suitably managed, ensuring the health and safety of all who might be affected by the work, including members of the public. CDM 2015 recognises two types of client:

commercial clients – have construction work carried out as part of their business. This could be an individual, partnership or company and includes property developers and companies managing domestic properties (click on link for roles & responsibilities: http://www.hse.gov.uk/Construction/cdm/2015/commercial-clients.htm)

domestic clients – have construction work carried out for them but not in connection with any business – usually work done on their own home or the home of a family member. CDM 2015 does not require domestic clients to carry out client duties as these normally pass to other dutyholders (click on link for roles & responsibilities: http://www.hse.gov.uk/Construction/cdm/2015/domestic-clients.htm)

Designer – An organisation or individual whose work involves preparing or modifying designs, drawings, specifications, bills of quantity or design calculations. Designers can be architects, consulting engineers and quantity surveyors, or anyone who specifies and alters designs as part of their work. They can also include tradespeople if they carry out design work. The designer’s main duty is to eliminate, reduce or control foreseeable risks that may arise during construction work, or in the use and maintenance of the building once built. Designers work under the control of a principal designer on projects with more than one contractor. (Click on link for roles & responsibilities: http://www.hse.gov.uk/Construction/cdm/2015/designers.htm)

Principal designer – A designer appointed by the client to control the pre-construction phase on projects with more than one contractor. The principal designer’s main duty is to plan, manage, monitor and coordinate health and safety during this phase, when most design work is carried out. (Click on link for roles & responsibilities: http://www.hse.gov.uk/Construction/cdm/2015/principal-designers.htm)

Principal contractor – A contractor appointed by the client to manage the construction phase on projects with more than one contractor. The principal contractor’s main duty is to plan, manage, monitor and coordinate health and safety during this phase, when all construction work takes place. (Click on link for roles & responsibilities: http://www.hse.gov.uk/Construction/cdm/2015/principal-contractors.htm)

Contractor – An individual or business in charge of carrying out construction work (eg building, altering, maintaining or demolishing). Anyone who manages this work or directly employs or engages construction workers is a contractor. Their main duty is to plan, manage and monitor the work under their control in a way that ensures the health and safety of anyone it might affect (including members of the public). Contractors work under the control of the principal contractor on projects with more than one contractor. (Click on link for roles & responsibilities: http://www.hse.gov.uk/Construction/cdm/2015/contractors.htm)

Worker – An individual who actually carries out the work involved in building, altering, maintaining or demolishing buildings or structures. Workers include: plumbers, electricians, scaffolders, painters, decorators, steel erectors and labourers, as well as supervisors like foremen and chargehands. Their duties include cooperating with their employer and other dutyholders, reporting anything they see that might endanger the health and safety of themselves or others. Workers must be consulted on matters affecting their health, safety and welfare. (Click on link for roles & responsibilities: http://www.hse.gov.uk/Construction/cdm/2015/workers.htm)

Click on the following link for a summary of duties under CDM 2015, or contact us on 07896 016380 or at fiona@eljay.co.uk for clarification or further information: http://www.hse.gov.uk/Construction/cdm/2015/summary.htm

Landlords will be required by law to install working smoke and carbon monoxide alarms in their properties

Landlords will be required by law to install working smoke and carbon monoxide alarms in their properties, under measures announced by Housing Minister Brandon Lewis today (11 March 2015).

The move will help prevent up to 26 deaths and 670 injuries a year.

The measure is expected to take effect from October 2015, and comes with strong support after a consultation on property condition in the private rented sector.

England’s 46 fire and rescue authorities are expected to support private landlords in their own areas to meet their new responsibilities with the provision of free alarms, with grant funding from government.

This is part of wider government moves to ensure there are sufficient measures in place to protect public safety, while at the same time avoiding regulation which would push up rents and restrict the supply of homes, limiting choice for tenants. For more information, click on the link: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/tenants-safer-under-new-government-measures or contact us on 07896 016380 or at fiona@eljay.co.uk

Drugs and driving: the law

It’s illegal to drive if either:

• you’re unfit to do so because you’re on legal or illegal drugs
• you have certain levels of illegal drugs in your blood (even if they haven’t affected your driving)

Legal drugs are prescription or over-the-counter medicines. If you’re taking them and not sure if you should drive, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or healthcare professional.

The police can stop you and make you do a ‘field impairment assessment’ if they think you’re on drugs. This is a series of tests, eg asking you to walk in a straight line. They can also use a roadside drug kit to screen for cannabis and cocaine.

If they think you’re unfit to drive because of taking drugs, you’ll be arrested and will have to take a blood or urine test at a police station.

You could be charged with a crime if the test shows you’ve taken drugs.

Prescription medicines

It’s illegal in England and Wales to drive with legal drugs in your body if it impairs your driving.

It’s an offence to drive if you have over the specified limits of certain drugs in your blood and you haven’t been prescribed them.

Talk to your doctor about whether you should drive if you’ve been prescribed any of the following drugs:

• amphetamine, eg dexamphetamine or selegiline
• clonazepam
• diazepam
• flunitrazepam
• lorazepam
• methadone
• morphine or opiate and opioid-based drugs, eg codeine, tramadol or fentanyl
• oxazepam
• temazepam

You can drive after taking these drugs if:

• you’ve been prescribed them and followed advice on how to take them by a healthcare professional
• they aren’t causing you to be unfit to drive even if you’re above the specified limits

You could be prosecuted if you drive with certain levels of these drugs in your body and you haven’t been prescribed them.

The law doesn’t cover Northern Ireland and Scotland but you could still be arrested if you’re unfit to drive.

For more information, click on the link: https://www.gov.uk/drug-driving-law or contact us on 07896 016380 or at fiona@eljay.co.uk

Simpler explosives and acetylene regulations

New laws on working safely with explosives and compressed acetylene gas took effect last Autumn.

Two new sets of consolidated regulations – The Explosives Regulations 2014 (ER) (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2014/1638/contents/made) and The Acetylene Safety (England and Wales and Scotland) Regulations 2014 (ASR) (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2014/1639/contents/made) came into force on 1 October 2014.

The revised regulations, which apply to the explosives industry and those who manufacture and store compressed acetylene gas, will help to reduce the regulatory burden on business and regulators by clarifying and simplifying requirements.

They have replaced the Approved Code of Practice (ACOP) for the Manufacture and Storage of Explosives Regulations 2005, a number of legislative instruments and the current explosives guidance.

Guidance produced to support ER, 2014 can be found at:

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/l150.htm
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/l151.htm

Revised guidance on working safely with acetylene can be found at:

http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg327.htm

Contact us on 07896 016380 or at fiona@eljay.co.uk for clarification of the above, or further information.

Storing petrol safely

Petrol is a dangerous substance; it is a highly flammable liquid and can give off vapour which can easily be set on fire and when not handled safely has the potential to cause a serious fire and/or explosion.

This means there is always a risk of a fire and/or an explosion if there is a source of ignition nearby, for example a naked flame, an electrical spark or similar. Because of these risks storing petrol safely is covered by legislation; and this applies to you if you store petrol.

What is the law on storing petrol safely?

The Petroleum (Consolidation) Regulations 2014 (PCR) link to external website which came into force on 1 October 2014 apply to:

• workplaces that store petrol where petrol is dispensed, ie retail and non retail petrol filling stations
• non-workplace premises storing petrol, for example at private homes, or at clubs/associations (or similar)

Petroleum Enforcement Authorities (PEAs), formerly Petroleum Licensing Authorities (PLAs) are responsible for enforcing the Petroleum (Consolidation) Regulations 2014. They also continue to enforce DSEAR at workplaces covered by PCR. This means that there is no change to the current enforcing arrangements.

The safe storage and use of petrol in workplaces is also covered by the Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations 2002 (DSEAR).

Who does this apply to?

Information on how the Petroleum (Consolidation) Regulations 2014 applies to the following groups:

• If you are an owner/employee of a petrol filling station
• If you store petrol at home, or at a club/association or similar premises
• If you design, manufacture or supply portable petrol storage containers
• If your workplace stores but does not dispense petrol

What does this legislation replace?

The Petroleum (Consolidation) Regulations 2014 combine, update and replace all previous legislation on petrol storage. The existing health and safety responsibilities remain the same; anything that is still relevant is included in the 2014 Regulations.

For more information, click on the link: http://www.hse.gov.uk/fireandexplosion/petroleum.htm or contact us on 07896 016380 or at fiona@eljay.co.uk

New & Revised Guidance

New and revised guidance is listed below. Please click on the accompanying links for more information.

Guidance Documents

A guide to workplace transport safety (HSG136 – published Sept 2014)
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/books/hsg136.htm

The selection, management and use of mobile elevating work platforms – Safe working practices (GEIS6 – published 2014)
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/geis6.htm

Web Pages

Dust Hub (provides information to help employers control exposure to dust in the workplace http://www.hse.gov.uk/dust/

Illness caused by welding fume and gases: there will be people who don’t get ill but some welders do get ill from breathing welding fume. Some may be ill for only a short time, others may get permanent illnesses like asthma. There is no easy way to know if it will be you. A few welders get so ill they have to stop welding and find a new career. http://www.hse.gov.uk/welding/illness.htm

COSHH e-tool: easy steps to control health risks from chemicals http://www.hse.gov.uk/coshh/essentials/coshh-tool.htm

Health and safety for disabled people: this guidance will help those employing disabled people to understand their health and safety responsibilities. http://www.hse.gov.uk/disability/

Noise and Vibration Partnership Group: includes noise and hand-arm vibration posters http://www.hse.gov.uk/noise/nv-partnership-group.htm

IOSH – No time to lose: Working together to beat occupational cancer http://www.iosh.co.uk/NTTL/Home/About-NTTL.aspx

Contains public sector information published by the Health and Safety Executive and licensed under the Open Government Licence

Also contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.